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BUDDHISMUS
_B2SPIRIT_
" Zazen je velka cesta, velka stezka. Je to zniceni nazoru, existence a neexistence, zivota, smrti, je to zniceni viry ve vecnost, v zanik. Je to nedualita. To, cemu nas uci zazen, je prava povaha vsech veci. Zazen odtina vsechny nase pochyby. Musime cvicit s velkou radosti. Toto cviceni je hluboke a tajemne, nikdo ho nemuze zmerit. Svetlo zazenu je jako jas slunce. Toto cviceni je nekonecne. "

- Mistr Debailly


"Zazen je nejhlubší odpověď na všechny otázky, které si člověk může položit.“


- Rev. Debailly









Zazen (dhyana) - buddhisticka meditace-koncentrace


Brno


Dódžó Myo ji

po: 18:30; čt: 18:30

Plzeň




15. července otevíráme nové dojo v Plzni na adrese Němejcova 6.
Denní praxe bude probíhat pod vedením zenového mistra Seï Yu Debailly.

Zazeny budou probíhat každý všední den ráno od 6:30 do 7:30 a večer od 18:00 do 19:00.




Zen dojo Plzeň

po, út, čt: 19:00-20:00, ranní praxe po domluvě

Praha


Zen dojo při Česko-Japonské společnosti

út: 6:15 - 8:00, 19:15 - 21:00; čt: 6:15 - 8:00


Daruma

čt: 18:45 - 21:30







Zen-buddhismus v České republice


Škola sótó ( Taisen Deshimaru přenesl praxi zenu v 60.letech do Evropy)

Zazen v česko-japonské společnosti na Můstku

http://www.zazen.cz/

Sangha mistra Kaisena - dojo Praha, Brno, Ostrava

http://www.sotozen.cz/

Sangha mistra Debaillyho

http://www.zen-asociace.cz

Zen Dojo v Plzni

http://www.zendojoplzen.cz/
Máte k tomu co říct? Vložte se do diskuze.
KOCOURMIKES --- 12:54:33 29.5.2017
'do not spend your life tying space into knots' - Longchenpa
KOCOURMIKES --- 12:15:29 27.5.2017
KOCOURMIKES --- 12:08:14 27.5.2017
Lama Gendun on Nature of Mind
The recognition of the nature of mind is the only thing that we actually need –it has the power to liberate us from everything and to liberate all beings in the universe, too. All phenomena of the external world are only the manifestations of the luminosity of our own mind and ultimately have no reality. When we allow our mind to rest in the recognition that everything that it experiences is its own projection, the separation between subject and object comes to an end. Then there is no longer anyone who grasps at something and nothing that is being grasped at –subject and object are recognized to be unreal. In order to experience this, we allow our mind to remain in its ordinary consciousness, the awareness of the present moment, which is the deep, unchanging nature of mind itself and which is also called “timeless awareness.” (yeshe) That is the natural insight that arises spontaneously when in every moment we look directly at the true nature of mind. In seeing the nature of mind, there is nothing to “see” since it is not an object of perception. We see it without seeing anything. We know it without knowing anything. The mind recognizes itself spontaneously, in a way beyond all duality. The path that leads to this is the awareness of the present moment, free of all interference. It is an error to think that the ultimate truth is difficult to recognize. The meditation on the nature of mind is actually very easy, as we do not have to go anywhere to find this nature. No work needs to be done to produce it; no effort is required to find it. It is sufficient for us to sit down, allow our mind to rest in itself and directly look at the one who thinks that it is difficult to find the nature of mind. In that moment, we discover it directly, as it is very close and always within easy reach. It would be absurd to worry that we might not succeed in discovering the nature of mind, as it is already present in us. It is sufficient to look into ourselves. When our mind directs its gaze upon itself, it finds itself and that the seeker and the sought are not two different things."
KOCOURMIKES --- 23:14:03 26.5.2017
From Natural Liberation, Padma Sambhava's teachings on the Six Bardos, as revealed by Karma Lingpa, commentary by Gyatrul Rinpoche:
From the Tantra of the Three Phrases of Liberation by Observation:
Oh Lord of Mysteries, the revelation of the Dharmakaya exists in dependence upon your body. Its locus is the core of your heart Its clarity is the clarity issuing from your eyes. The Buddha dwells inside your heart, and though it is enclosed by the body of flesh and blood, it is not covered. Thus, unobscured by the body , it is clearly, unobstructedly present in the three times. That is the unborn and undying quality of your awareness.
Gyatrul Rinpoche comments:
The statement clarity (gsal-ba) issuing out from your eyes pertains to the channel that connects the heart to the eyes. This clarity is a kind of luminosity, and since it is beyond the three times of the past, present, and future, it is unborn and undying.
The Tantra continues:
Oh, Lord of Mysteries, there are the instructions for actualizing the Dharmakaya: external space is this empty intervening space: internal space is the empty, hollow channel that connects the eyes and the heart (ka-ti), and the secret space is the precious palace of your own heart. Direct your awareness to your eyes; direct your eyes to the intervening space, and by leaving your gaze there, primordial wisdom freely arises. When consciousness is directed to your eyes, nonconceptual awareness alone will appear, without being obscured by any compulsive ideation."
KOCOURMIKES --- 23:06:17 26.5.2017
"Without thinking, it's right there." Full Stop!
KOCOURMIKES --- 22:52:18 26.5.2017
Advanced Dzogchen Core Instructions
Dzogchen Sky Gazing Theory and Practice

From the Dzogchen Master, Gyatrul Rinpoche’s teaching:
”Steadly fix your gaze in the space in front of you, into the vacuity at the level of the tip of your nose, without any disorderliness or duplicity. This is the benefit of this gaze:
In the center of the hearts of all beings there is the hollow crystal kati channel, which is a channel of primordial wisdom. If it points down and is closed off, primordial wisdom is obscured, and
delusion grows.
Thus, in animals that channel faces downwards and is closed off, so they are foolish and deluded. In humans that channel points horizontally and is slightly open, so human intelligence is bright and our consciousness is clear. In people who have attained siddhis and in bodhisattvas that channel is open and faces upwards,
so there arise unimaginable samadhis, primordial wisdom of knowledge, and vast extrasensory perceptions.
These occur due to the open quality of that channel of primordial wisdom. Thus, when the eyes are closed, that channel is closed off and points down, so consciousness is dimmed by the delusion of darkness.
By steadily fixing the gaze, that channel faces up and opens, which
isolates “pure awareness from impure awareness” (the authentic
rushan).
Then clear, thought-free samadhi arises, and numerous pure visions appear. Thus, the gaze is important..... the hollow crystal kati channel is kept secret, and there are no discussions of this special channel of primordial wisdom. This channel is unlike the central channel, the right channel, the left channel, or any of the channels of the five chakras; it is absolutely not the same as any of them. Its shape is like that of a peppercorn that is just about open, there is no blood or lymph inside it, and it is limpid and clear.
The lower yanas do not have even the name of this channel. Thus, while steadily maintaining the gaze, place the awareness unwaveringly, steadily, clearly, nakedly, and fixedly, without having anything on which to meditate, in the sphere of space. When stability increases, examine the consciousness that is stable. Then gently release and relax.....”

Clarity (gsal-ba) is the radiance of the Dharmakaya. It is the essential nature of Rigpa, the essential and timeless aspect that arises in each moment. It is the non-conceptual knowingness aspect of Rigpa also known as yeshe.
Rigpa has essentially two components in oneness: The emptiness (kadag) aspect of the Dharmakaya and the arising of presence as the clarity of gsal-ba: Clear Light. (lhundrub).
It is this arising aspect (nature, rang-zhin) that is the luminosity that arises from the heart center that shines through the ka-ti channel out through the eyes. But it is also the awareness that allows hearing, smell, taste and touch to function. It is in the aspect or sense of touch that it is all pervasive throughout the body. But the main aspect for practice is the visual aspect of clarity that is centered in the lamp of the eyes, the fluid lasso lamp."
The Tantra of the Self-arising Buddha states:
Unimpeded primordial wisdom, which reveals itself in the embodiments of primordial wisdom, has for its basis one’s own eyes. Its location is in the center of one pupils. Its luminosity is the clarity of unimpeded vision. This infinite unimpededness in the center of one’s pupils is the embodiment of the unimpeded primordial wisdom of the buddhas. This luminosity of the eyes seeing without impediment is called the fluid lasso lamp.
The Tantra of the Essential Meaning of Avalokitesvara states:
Thus, the basis of the experience of the clear light is the fluid lasso lamp.
(Quotes from A Spacious Path to Freedom and Naked Awareness, both by Karma Chagme, 17th century)
Lopon Tenzin Namdak says in his Bonpo Dzogchen Teachings:
The word Sal-ba (gsal-ba) means clarity, but this is not a physical, visible light. Here clear (gsal-ba) means present and aware. Rigpa is a synonym for clarity. (gsal-ba) (pp. 85)
From Natural Liberation, Padma Sambhava teachings on the Six Bardos, as revealed by Karma Lingpa, commentary by Gyatrul Rinpoche:
From the Tantra of the Three Phrases of Liberation by Observation:
Oh Lord of Mysteries, the revelation of the Dharmakaya exists in dependence upon your body. Its locus is the core of your heart Its clarity is the clarity issuing from your eyes. The Buddha dwells inside your heart, and though it is enclosed by the body of flesh and blood, it is not covered. Thus, unobscured by the body , it is clearly, unobsturctedly present in the three times. That is the unborn and undying quality of your awareness.
Gyatrul Rinpoche comments:
The statement that clarity (gsal-ba) issuing out from your eyes pertains to the channel that connects the heart to the eyes. This clarity is a kind of luminosity, and since it is beyond the three times of the past, present, and future, it is unborn and undying.
The Tantra continues:
Oh, Lord of Mysteries, there are the instructions for actualizing the Dharmakaya: external space is this empty intervening space: internal space is the empty, hollow channel that connects the eyes and the heart (ka-ti), and the secret space is the precious palace of your own heart.
Direct your awareness to your eyes; direct your eyes to the intervening space, and by leaving your gaze there, primordial wisdom freely arises. When consciousness is directed to your eyes, nonconceptual awareness alone will appear, without being obscured by any compulsive ideation. Pp. 176
Padma Sambhava continues:
The main practice of the meditation, called the meditation of the threefold space is to be practiced while the body is in the posture of Vairocana with its seven attributes. (normal sitting meditation posture) (or in a chair)
Inwardly focus this empty mind-itself on the inter-connecting pathway of the empty, hollow channel(ka-ti). Identifying the aperture called the “fluid lasso lamp”directing your awareness to the eyes. Let the eyes gaze fixedly at this fresh, external space, and also focus your awareness into the space in front of you. Without meditating on anything, simply without wavering, let it be steady, luminous, and even.
Gyatrul Rinpoche comments:
"This practice is quite similar to the Leap-Over practice (thogal). You can learn the significance of this practice only by experiencing it for yourself. Just as you must feed your children for them to grow up, you need to feed your self through practice. By initially reading these teachings, you may get some understanding, but that alone does not suffice."
Padma Sambhava continues:
First practice in short sessions, and as you become accustomed to it, practice in longer and longer sessions. When you bring the session to an end, do not get up abruptly, but rise slowly without losing the sense of meditating: and proceed without losing the sense of awareness, without wavering, and without grasping. As you eat, drink, speak, and engage in every activity, do without losing the sentry of unwavering mindfulness. If this happens in meditative equipoise but not afterwards, by integrating this with your spiritual practice and all activities of moving, walking, lying down, and sitting, whatever you do will appear as meditation.
pp 177
From "Wonders of the Natural Mind" by Tenzin Wangyal pp 119:
"It is of great importance to have the experiential, and not merely conceptual, understanding of the inseparability of external surrounding space, the internal space with objects, and the secret space in the mind. When the Dzogchen teachings talk about integrating the mind with space through the practice of gazing into the sky, the practitioner is trying to be present in the inseparability of these three spaces.
The reason the practice is performed by gazing is not to limit sense perception to the visual sense consciousness only. It is possible to experience the inseparability of the three spaces through all the senses.
The eye sense organ is favored because it is the most important of the five sense consciousnesses and because it is associated with the space element. It is through the eyes that we see the base wisdom while gazing into space.
Inner luminosity originates in the heart and passes through two channels that connect the empty space of the heart with the external empty space of the sky through the eyes, the water light doors of the inner light. Thus it is through the eyes that the inner luminosity is projected into external space.
In this way the space element of the heart, the space element of the eye sense consciousness, and the external surrounding space element of the sky are connected.
***This is integration with space, and we no longer feel limited by our bodies to one specific location but are present everywhere in space with no boundaries."***
Continued: (pp 127)
“It can be said that when we experience the fruition of the sky gazing practice we are seeing primordial awareness itself through our physical eyes, experiencing and realizing it while the moving-mind awareness is continuously and undistractedly present through the eye sense consciousness. In this way we develop the trekchod contemplation practice of remaining in union with space.”
I hope the materials above have helped to clarify and explain the theory and practice of “sky gazing” practice. I do have many additional textual sources that I could continue to quote, but I feel these are some of the best. I have practiced sky gazing myself for many years since receiving the transmissions and instructions from Norbu Rinpoche almost 30 years ago.
It would be a great benefit for all to put this practice to use. I have included many specific instructions on earlier posts, regarding postures, gaze etc. Never face the sun when doing this practice. You can actually do it in any space not just the sky. In a room, just focus on the space in front of you, not the objects or walls.
Through these practices and the resulting direct experiential insights that arise; it becomes clear that no study, empowerments, rituals or concepts are necessary in Dzogchen Ati Yoga.
KOCOURMIKES --- 22:43:02 26.5.2017
Sam Harris describes Dzogchen pointing out:
Sam writes:
Sam: Not at all. Though I think you could be well served if you ever had the opportunity to study the Tibetan Buddhist practice of Dzogchen.
Dan: Joseph Goldstein, who’s a friend to both of us, recently put out this supplement to daily practice where he says, “Listen to all the sounds that arise in your consciousness and then try to find who or what is hearing them.” I find that when I do that, I’m directed into a space completely different from the one I arrive at when I’m sitting there watching my breath. I’m wondering if that is the kind of shift in attention you’re talking about. Is that what you would recommend as a way to bridge the gap you’ve just described?
Sam: Yes. Looking for the mind, or the thinker, or the one who is looking, is often taught as a preliminary exercise in Dzogchen, and it gets your attention pointed in the right direction. It’s different from focusing on the sensation of breathing. You’re simply turning attention upon itself—and this can provoke the insight I’m talking about. It’s possible to look for the one who is looking and to find, conclusively, that no one is there to be found.
People who have done a lot of meditation practice, who know what it’s like to concentrate deeply on an object like the breath, often develop a misconception that the truth is somewhere deep within. But non-duality is not deep. It’s right on the surface. This is another way the window analogy works well: Your reflection is not far away. You just need to know where to look for it. It’s not a matter of going deeper and deeper into subtlety until your face finally reveals itself. It is literally right before your eyes in every moment. When you turn attention upon itself and look for the thinker of your thoughts, the absence of any center to consciousness can be glimpsed immediately. It can’t be found by going deeper. To go deep—into the breath or any other phenomenon you can notice—is to start looking out the window at the trees.
The trick is to become sensitive to what consciousness is like the instant you try to turn it upon itself. In that first instant, there’s a gap between thoughts that can grow wider and become more salient. The more it opens, the more you can notice the character of consciousness prior to thought. This is true whether it’s ordinary consciousness—you standing bleary-eyed in line at Starbucks—or you’re in the middle of a three-month retreat and your body feels like it’s made of light. It simply doesn’t matter what the contents of consciousness are. The self is an illusion in any case.
It’s also useful to do this practice with your eyes open, because vision seems to anchor the feeling of subject/object duality more than any other sense. Most of us feel quite strongly that we are behind our eyes, looking out at a world that is over there. But the truth—subjectively speaking; I’m not making a claim about physics—is that everything is just appearing in consciousness. Losing the sense of subject/object duality with your eyes open can be the most vivid way to experience this shift in perception. That’s why Dzogchen practitioners tend to meditate with their eyes open.
Dan: So I would look at something and ask myself who is seeing it?
Sam: Yes—but it’s not a matter of verbally asking yourself the question. The crucial gesture is to attempt to turn attention upon itself and notice what changes in that first instant. Again, it’s not a matter of going deep within. You don’t have to work up to this thing. It’s a matter of looking for the looker and in that first moment noticing what consciousness is like. Once you notice that it is wide open and unencumbered by the feeling of self, that very insight becomes the basis of your mindfulness."
KOCOURMIKES --- 21:36:04 26.5.2017
Sam Harris shared:
"For instance, I once had an opportunity to study with the great Tibetan lama Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche in Nepal. Before making the trip, I had a dream in which he seemed to give me teachings about the nature of the mind. This dream struck me as interesting for two reasons: (1) The teachings I received were novel, useful, and convergent with what I later understood to be true; and (2) I had never met Khyentse Rinpoche, nor was I aware of having seen a photograph of him. This preceded my access to the Internet by at least five years, so the belief that I had never seen his picture was more plausible than it would be now. I also recall that I had no easy way of finding a picture of him for the sake of comparison. But because I was about to meet the man himself, it seemed that I would be able to confirm whether it had really been him in my dream.
First, the teachings: The lama in my dream began by asking who I was. I responded by telling him my name. Apparently, this wasn’t the answer he was looking for.
“Who are you?” he said again. He was now staring fixedly into my eyes and pointing at my face with an outstretched finger. I did not know what to say.
“Who are you?” he said again, continuing to point.
“Who are you?” he said a final time, but here he suddenly shifted his gaze and pointing finger, as though he were now addressing someone just to my left. The effect was quite startling, because I knew (insofar as one can be said to know anything in a dream) that we were alone. The lama was obviously pointing to someone who wasn’t there, and I suddenly noticed what I would later come to consider an important truth about the nature of the mind: Subjectively speaking, there is only consciousness and its contents; there is no inner self who is conscious. The feeling of being the experiencer of your experience, rather than identical to the totality of experience, is an illusion. The lama in my dream seemed to dissect this very feeling of being a self and, for a brief moment, removed it from my mind. I awoke convinced that I had glimpsed something quite profound."
KOCOURMIKES --- 20:17:57 24.5.2017
Twofold Emptiness Explained
The first fold is "emptiness of self":
There seems to be a lot of misunderstanding regarding the question of selfhood and whether a personal, individual self of any kind actually exists. Some think there is a personal self that underlies the fictional self, which is only a conceptual construction. This is the view of an "atman" or "self-soul" that the Buddha thoroughly refuted. The so called conventional self can't be found to exist within the body-mind nor outside the body-mind. That leaves no other option for its existence except within imagination.
In a dark room, a rope may be mistaken to be a snake, along with all the descriptions about snakes that the mind contains. We feel anxiety, fear and our adrenalin and blood pressures go up, as well as heart beat.
But if we look closely at the rope in brighter light, we won't be able to find a snake within the rope, or upon the rope, nor outside of the rope. That leaves only the imagination as its residence. It's the same regarding our snake-self. Our body-mind is like the rope. The mind infers a self as a personal "me" upon and within the body-mind in the darkness of confused mental functioning. We have real feelings felt about this imaginary "me" that create moods, altered bio-chemistry and sense of a "suffering me". But if we introspectively look within our mental events, we won't find a "me" anywhere; not in the body, not in the mind; we only find thoughts and feelings ABOUT a self, but no self is discovered. Then the lights go on and suddenly the subconscious mind ceases to generate the mistaken "me" belief. The personal self or "me" was no more real than the imaginary snake! There is no "liberation or enlightenment" beyond this direct insight and cessation of this cognitive error, and none without it. Read this below.
Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyatso:
"When we realize the selflessness of the individual, however, this whole process stops. The wrong views that have their root in the belief in self cease, then the mental afflictions cease, then karmic actions cease, and as a result of that, birth in samsara’s cycle of existence ceases."
Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyamtso
"We can formulate the following logical reasoning: Karmic actions and results are mere appearances devoid of true existence, because no self, no actor, exists to perform them. This is a valid way to put things because if the self of the individual does not exist, there cannot be any action, and therefore there cannot be any result of any action either."
Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyamtso
"Someone might ask, “Isn’t it nihilistic to think that karmic actions and their results do not exist?” In fact, this is not a nihilistic view because there exists no self to have any nihilistic view. There can be a nihilistic view only if there is someone to hold it, but since there is no one to have any view, then there can be no nihilism. Furthermore, since the thought of nihilism neither arises nor abides nor ceases, there can be no nihilism in genuine reality. Genuine reality transcends the conceptual fabrications of realism and nihilism. It transcends karmic actions and results, and the absence of karmic actions and results as well. If karmic actions and their results do not exist in the abiding nature of reality, then what is the quality of their appearance?
Nagarjuna describes this in the chapter’s thirty-third verse:
Mental afflictions, actions, and bodies, as well as actors and results, are like cities of imaginary beings, like mirages, and like dreams."
Khenpo Tsulstrim Gyatso
"Some people might argue, “There are yogis and yoginis who realize selflessness, and this proves that the self really does exist after all, or else who would be the ones who possessed this realization?”
Nagarjuna answers this claim in the third verse:
"The ones who do not cling to “me” or “mine” do not exist either. Those who do not cling to “me” or “mine” see accurately, So they do not see a self."
Khenpo Tsulstrim
The second "fold" is "emptiness of all objectively existing things":
In the Sutra Requested by Madröpa, the Buddha said:
Whatever arises from conditions does not arise. It does not have the nature of arising. Whatever depends on conditions is explained to be empty, And to know emptiness is the way to be conscientious.
IN THIS CHAPTER, Nagarjuna explains the meaning of this passage and proves its validity with logical reasoning. The reason Nagarjuna composed this chapter was that people believe that causal conditions are real. As a result of that, they believe that things really happen. They believe that arising is real. When they believe that, it is difficult for them to believe in emptiness and to gain confidence that all phenomena are empty of inherent existence. However, in order to understand the true nature of reality, we must realize that nothing ever really happens. We must realize that arising and birth are not real. Therefore, Nagarjuna analyzes causes, conditions, and arising, and he proves that they are in fact empty of any inherent nature.
Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso
KOCOURMIKES --- 22:05:41 23.5.2017
KOCOURMIKES: "No thought: no problem. It’s not possible to have a problem without believing a prior thought. To notice this simple truth is the beginning of peace." Byron Katie