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Sdílení elektronických akademických zdrojů na téma informační technologie a sociální/humanitní vědy
PALO_FABUS
[http://5.media.tumblr.com/9cyPFQbgCmuss1nprwA0Eo6co1_500.gif]


diskuse zaměřena na sdílení a shromážďování elektronických zdrojů: časopisy, mailing listy, newslettery, journal alerts, institucionální weby, databáze, nebo přímo studie, články, eseje, pokud je považujete za hodné pozornosti... vítané jsou taky archivační, citační či kolaborativní nástroje, které se osvědčily či se nabízejí k otestování
Máte k tomu co říct? Vložte se do diskuze.
??? --- 9:55:31 13.9.2018
Scientific publishing is a rip-off. We fund the research – it should be free | George Monbiot | Opinion | The Guardian
https://www.theguardian.com/...ree/2018/sep/13/scientific-publishing-rip-off-taxpayers-fund-research

TADEAS --- 11:36:43 9.8.2018
Russia is building a new Napster — but for academic research
https://www.washingtonpost.com/.../07/13/russia-is-building-a-new-napster-but-for-academic-research/

What will future historians see as the major Russian contribution to early 21st-century Internet culture? It might not be troll farms and other strategies for poisoning public conversation — but rather, the democratization of access to scientific and scholarly knowledge. Over the last decade, Russian academics and activists have built free, remarkably comprehensive online archives of scholarly works. What Napster was to music, the Russian shadow libraries are to knowledge.

Much of the current attention to these libraries focuses on Sci-Hub, a huge online library created by Kazakhstan-based graduate student Aleksandra Elbakyan. Started in 2011, Sci-Hub has made freely available an archive of over 60 million articles, drawn primarily from paywalled databases of major scientific publishers. Its audience is massive and global. In 2017, the service provided nearly 200 million downloads. Because most scholars in high-income countries already have paid access to the major research databases through their university libraries, its main beneficiaries are students and faculty from middle- and low-income countries, who frequently do not.

Such underground flows of knowledge from more- to less-privileged universities are not new. But they used to depend on slower and less-reliable networks, such as developing-world students and faculty traveling to and from Western universities, bringing back photocopies and later hard drives full of scholarly work. Sci-Hub scaled this process up to meet the demand of an increasingly interconnected global scientific community, where the first barrier to participation was access to research.
TADEAS --- 11:34:47 9.8.2018
Guerrilla Open Access
Author(s): Laurie Allen, Balázs Bodó, Chris Kelty

Abstract:
In the 1990s, the Internet offered a horizon from which to imagine what society could become, promising autonomy and self-organization next to redistribution of wealth and collectivized means of production. While the former was in line with the dominant ideology of freedom, the latter ran contrary to the expanding enclosures in capitalist globalization. This antagonism has led to epochal copyrights, where free software and piracy kept the promise of radical commoning alive. Free software, as Christopher Kelty writes in this pamphlet, provided a model ‘of a shared, collective, process of making software, hardware and infrastructures that cannot be appropriated by others’. Well into the 2000s, it served as an inspiration for global free culture and open access movements who were speculating that distributed infrastructures of knowledge production could be built, as the Internet was, on top of free software. For a moment, the hybrid world of advanced Internet giants—sharing code, advocating open standards and interoperability—and users empowered by these services, convinced almost everyone that a new reading/writing culture was possible. Not long after the crash of 2008, these disruptors, now wary monopolists, began to ingest smaller disruptors and close off their platforms. There was still free software somewhere underneath, but without the ‘original sense of shared, collective, process’. So, as Kelty suggests, it was hard to imagine that for-profit academic publishers wouldn't try the same with open access.

Notes:
This pamphlet is published in a series of 7 as part of the Radical Open Access II conference, which took place June 26-27 at Coventry University. More information about this conference and about the contributors to this pamphlet can be found at: http://radicaloa.co.uk/conferences/ROA2. This pamphlet was made possible due to generous funding from The Post Office, a project of Coventry University’s Centre for Postdigital Cultures and the combined efforts of authors, editors, designers & printers.

Download: https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:19825/
TADEAS --- 12:02:51 12.6.2018
The latest Sci-Hub working domain(Last check time:2018-06-12 18:00:02)
https://sci-hub.love/

This page is to collect the new Sci-Hub working domain which is auto refreshed every 5 minutes
TADEAS --- 11:41:17 12.6.2018